Seth Hillstrom (SH):

Brian Wong, you’re 26 years old and your laundry-list of achievements (and the title of your book, “The Cheat Code”) make it pretty clear that you know something we don’t. So while we are extremely excited for your upcoming presentation at eBev, I thought today it would be fun to tap into that big brain of yours and see if you can predict the future! Thanks for chatting with me and I’ll jump right in:

Is AI/machine learning a godsend for our businesses (as many marketers like myself are hoping), or is it “the greatest existential threat to humanity,” as Elon Musk suggests?

 

Brian Wong (BW):

I don’t think Machine Learning is going to threaten humanity in the short term. It’s hard to know what could happen of course. I do believe that it is important to leverage AI/ML tools with human influence to make sure that customer experiences are the best they can be in the interim. I also think that companies that aren’t already strategizing for how these technologies will change their work flows and revenue streams in the future are already behind. So get with the program!

 

SH:

Wearable and now even implantable technologies are making me think we’re already advancing from the IoT to the IoP (people). As consumers share increasingly endless streams of data with marketers: a) what types of information are you most interesting in capturing and b) how do we make sure that this information is used safely and responsibly?

BW:

I think it’s critical to not just assume that all data from these devices are going to be useful. It’s going to involve significant “moments” (a nod to our model of course) in time where the behaviors exhibited from said devices indicate a need. So think “tired moments”, or “hunger moments”, or “boredom moments” coming from a wearable, an injest-able, or a connected mattress / pillow. I think we need to make sure that the data is always used to improve the consumer’s life – that’s critical.

 

SH:

As brand marketers search for opportunities to tap into moments tied to emotion – something Kiip does very well – I can’t help but think that we’re missing opportunities around us. Tell me why you believe so strongly in engaging around moments and where you think we as marketers might be missing opportunities to connect with our consumers?

 

BW:

As I’ve alluded to above – moments indicate needs and is an appropriate perspective on advertising opportunities that align the closest to what a consumer actually needs/wants, vs just a convenient placement for an advertiser and a publisher. I think it’s a marketing and advertising opportunity that gives us insight into the connected consumer – one that is executing more and more actions and behavior on devices that are connected and as a result expect advertisers and digital service providers to be more and more relevant in what they offer.

 

SH:

Thank you so much Brian Wong for sharing your perspective with us. The key takeaways i’m getting are that as we develop new technologies, it’s of paramount importance that we keep consumers’ needs at the center of our purpose and human oversight/direction. This sounds to me like a good formula for mitigating privacy concerns while spurring highly successful marketing opportunities (by meeting needs efficiently).

 

 

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